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ADVAPIX TPX3

AdvaPIX TPX3 X-ray Detector

The AdvaPIX TPX3 camera was designed with special emphasis on performance and versatility, which is often required in scientific experimental work.

Description

The camera module contains CERN’s latest Timepix3 device. This can be used in different configurations such as a stack of several layers, tiled to cover a larger area or a combination of both. Each module contains a single Timepix device with fast parallel readout up to 40 million hits per second, independent of frame occupancy. A separate USB 3.0 communication channel for each device assures fast read-out of the whole modular system. All modules in the system can be operated synchronously or triggered independently. Choose from a Si or CdTe sensor and a thickness to suit your application.

The ADVAPIX can be used in a variety of applications such as fast radiography (X-rays, neutrons, ions), spectroscopic imaging (each pixel records the energy spectrum), particle tracking, time-of-flight imaging, multilayer Compton camera (thin top sensor, thick bottom sensor) to name just a few. The sensors can be adapted for neutron imaging by deposition of converter layers. The spatial resolution in some applications (slow neutrons) can reach units of microns or even sub-micrometric level (ions). Compared to the older Timepix chip, the Timepix3 detector offers 6x better time resolution, 2x better energy resolution, 2x lower minimum energy threshold, zero dead time, and 10x faster data transfer.

Key Features of AdvaPIX TPX3:

  • Sensor Material: Si or CdTe
  • Sensor Thickness: 100 μm, 300 μm and 500 μm for Si; 1 mm for CdTe
  • Sensitive Area: 14 mm x 14 mm
  • Time Resolution: 1.6 ns
  • Readout Speed: 40 Million hits/s
  • Number of Pixels 256 x 256
  • Pixel Pitch: 55 μm
  • Energy Resolution: 1 keV
  • Min Detectable Energy: 3 keV for X-rays
  • Readout Chip: Timepix3
  • Pixel Mode of Operation: Time-over-Threshold, Time-of -Arrival
  • Connectivity: USB 3.0 (Super-Speed)
  • Weight: 503 g
  • Dimensions: 125 mm x 79 mm x 25.5 mm
  • Software: Pixet Pro

View/ Download the datasheet here.

Non-Destructive Testing

Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) is inspection, test, or evaluation of materials, components or assemblies for discontinuities, or differences in characteristics without destroying the serviceability of the sample. Standard radiographic X-ray imaging provides a black and white intensity or density image of the inspected sample where defects, impurities or cracks are observed if the resolution and the signal over the noise of the image is appropriate. The spectral NDT X-ray imaging provides based on photon counting provides additional material information of the samples together with a superior contrast and high spatial resolution. The spectral material information is used to discriminate different materials that can be used to identify the materials of interest or to calculate their amount in the sample. Find out more about this application here.

X-ray Diffraction

X-ray diffraction is analytical method based on inspection of crystalline structure of samples used in applications, such as metallurgy, mineralogy, powders, pigments, polymers, surface layers and strain mapping. The traditional X-ray diffraction uses monochromatic X-rays which make the apparatus large and slow. ADVACAM’s spectral detectors based on Timepix3 chip with high resolution makes the diffraction system fast and compact. The sample analysis can be performed 100 times faster compared to the conventional systems. Due to fast speed of the analysis large areas of the sample can be analysed by scanning. Find out more about this application here.

Other Applications

ADVACAM offers cameras and solutions for multiple other application such as electron microscopy, crystallography, neutron imaging, charged particle tracking and dosimetry for cancer therapy. In addition, number of cameras are being used in the basic research, such as at CERN’s LHC accelerator, and for education of radiation and its properties in schools and universities. Find out more about this here.

Advacam Technology

The leading detector technology, which Advacam uses for its products and solutions is based on Medipix hybrid pixel detectors. These devices were developed within international collaboration of universities and research laboratories lead by team at CERN during past 20 years. Advacam team’s members have been part of the Medipix Collaboration from it inception and have been contributing to the technology.

Photon Counting Technology

Advacam’s imaging cameras are direct conversion single photon counting pixel detectors that represent the cutting edge of current radiation imaging technology. The term “single photon counting” means that every single photon of X-ray radiation detected in individual pixel is processed and counted. The technology brings two major advantages in comparison to the conventional X-ray imaging – high contrast together with sharp images and spectral information of X-rays that allows material specific information to be displayed in colors.

In the direct conversion cameras each pixel of the semiconductor crystal is directly connected to the complex CMOS circuit using a conductive solder bump. In the indirect conversion cameras a scintillation layer is attached on top of a photodiode. The photodiodes manufactured on a simple CMOS circuit that enables fine pixel sizes

 

Illustrative comparison of a single pixel of a direct conversion and indirect conversion cameras.

The term direct conversion refers to immediate conversion of the X-rays into electric charge within the semiconductor crystal. The principle is contrary to the conventional indirect conversion where the X-rays are first converted into visible light in the scintillation layer that subsequently is converted into electric charge in the photodiodes.

 

Illustration of the operation principles in a single pixel between the direct and indirect conversion cameras.

 

The photon counting principle of detection eliminates all other sources of noise that are present in CCD or flat-panel based cameras. This leads to considerably better signal-to-noise ratio and therefore detectability of more details in images. The images sharpness or the actual spatial resolution of the captured image is defined by the electric charge in the CMOS readout. Even thought the pixel size of of the direct converting cameras is larger than that of the conventional indirect conversion cameras, the signal of the detected X-rays is better focused into the pixels. The typical size of a direct conversion pixel ranges from few millimeters to tens of micro meters where Advacam represents the highest pixel density of the current industrial X-ray cameras with 55 um pixel size. The video below describes the differences between conventional indirect conversion, direct conversion charge integrating and photon counting cameras. It summarises the major differences in the captured image quality in terms of spatial resolution, image noise and material discrimination.

 

 

The energy sensitivity is as important advancement of the imaging technology as was the colour photography and film. Contrary to regular X-ray imaging cameras, the photon counting cameras can discriminate or even directly measure energy (wavelength) of incoming photons. Since each element of the sample has different X-ray attenuating properties, it is possible to estimate material composition of the sample if the energy of the photons is measured. The spectral sensitivity offers major improvement over the conventional X-ray imaging cameras.

 

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